Rules: Axis and Allies 1942


NOTE: Although mostly the same as the tabletop rules, these rules have been modified to reflect the online version of the game. The rules themselves have not changed - just the presentation.

HOW THE WAR IS WON

 Axis & Allies® can be played by up to five players. Each player controls one or more world powers. On your turn, you build, deploy, maneuver, and command army divisions, air wings, and naval fleets to loosen your foes’ hold on their territories. On
your opponents’ turns, they will bring their forces against you. The more territories you hold, the more weapons you can build—and the more powerful those weapons can be.

 On the map are twelve victory cities crucial to the war effort. As the game begins, each side controls six of these cities. The Allies begin the game controlling Washington, London, Leningrad, Moscow, Calcutta, and Los Angeles. The Axis powers begin the game controlling Berlin, Paris, Rome, Shanghai, Manila, and Tokyo. The default victory condition is if your side controls nine (9) victory cities at the end of a complete round of play (after the completion of the U.S. turn), you win the war.

NOTE: Whereas the the tabletop version of Axis & Allies 1942 has only two possible options as to what constitutes a win (Standard: 9, Total: 12), Game Table Online offers several possible victory conditions, which all players must agree upon during game set-up:

MINOR: 8

MODERATE: 9 (default)

MAJOR: 10

DECISIVE: 11

TOTAL: 12

THE COMBATANTS

One or more players take the side of the Axis, and one or more play the Allies. In a five-player game, each player controls one world power. If fewer people play, some will control more than one power. Game Table Online uses the system devised in Axis & Allies (Revised) to assign power divisions in multiplayer games:

Two-Player Game

Three-Player Game

Four-Player Game

Five-Player Game

SETUP

National Production Chart

This chart keeps track of each power’s industrial production level (income) during the game.

 

Industrial Production Credits

These are the money of the game, representing capacity for military production. Starting totals for each power are as follows. (These amounts are equal to each power’s beginning national production level.)

 Power IPCs
 Soviet Union 24
 Germany      40
 United Kingdom 30
 Japan          30
 United States 42 

 

Battle Board and Dice

The battle board is a large display that lists attacking and defending units and their combat strengths. When combat occurs, this board appears, and the units involved in combat are automatically placed on it. Combat is resolved by rolling dice.

National Control Markers

National control markers indicate status in the game. They mark conquered territories and indicate national production levels.
Take all of the national control markers that belong to your power.

GAME BOARD

The game board is a map of the world, circa 1942. It is divided into spaces, either territories (on land) or sea zones, separated by border lines.

Spaces On The Game Board

The border colors of the territories on the game board show which power controls them at the start of the game. Each power
has its own color. All other spaces are neutral and are not aligned with any power.

Most territories have an income value ranging from 1 to 12. This is the number of IPCs they produce each turn for their
controller. A few territories, such as Gibraltar, have no income value.

Units can move between adjacent spaces (those that share a common border). The game board wraps around horizontally. Territories and sea zones on the right edge of the board are adjacent to territories and sea zones on the left edge, as indicated by corresponding letters along the board edges (A connects to A, B to B, and so on). The top and bottom edges of the board do not wrap around.

All territories exist in one of three conditions:

Friendly:

 Controlled by you or a friendly power
(one on your side).

 Hostile:

 Controlled by an enemy power (one on
the opposing side).

 Neutral:

Not controlled by any power. Control of
neutral territories never changes.

Sea zones are either friendly or hostile. Friendly sea zones contain no enemy surface warships. Hostile sea zones contain
enemy surface warships (this does not include enemy submarines and transports).

Neutral Territories

Neutral territories (such as Turkey, Mongolia, or Sahara) have white borders. They represent areas that are impassable for
political or geographical reasons. You cannot attack neutral territories, move through them, or move over them with air units.
Neutral territories do not have income values.

Optional Rule: In order to maintain its neutrality, Turkey closed the narrow straights linking the Black Sea and the
Mediterranean, permitting no naval passage by any belligerent nation on either side. No sea units may move into or out of sea
zone 16, however, air units may move through this sea zone freely.

Canals

There are two canals—artificial waterways that connect two larger bodies of water—on the game board. The Panama Canal connects the Pacific Ocean (sea zone 20) to the Atlantic Ocean (sea zone 19), while the Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea (sea zone 15) to the Indian Ocean (sea zone 34). A canal is not considered a space, so it does not block land movement: Land units can move freely between Trans-Jordan and Anglo-Egypt Sudan. Panama is one territory: No land movement points are required to cross the canal within Panama.

If you want to move sea units through a canal, your side (but not necessarily your power) must control it at the start of your
turn (that is, you cannot use it the turn you capture it). The side that controls Panama controls the Panama Canal. The side that
controls both Anglo-Egypt Sudan and Trans-Jordan controls the Suez Canal. If one side controls Anglo-Egypt Sudan and the
other controls Trans-Jordan, the Suez Canal is closed to sea units.

The movement of air units is completely unaffected by canals, whether they are moving over land or water. They can pass between sea zones connected by the canal regardless of which side controls it.

Islands

An island is a territory located in or surrounded by sea zones.
A sea zone can contain at most one group of islands, which is
considered one territory. It is not possible to split up land-based
units so that they are on different islands in the same group.

ORDER OF PLAY

Axis & Allies is played in rounds. A round consists of each player taking a turn, and then a check to see if one side or the other has won the game.

Order of Play

     1. Soviet Union

     2. Germany

     3. United Kingdom

     4. Japan

     5. United States

     6. Check for victory

Your power's turn consists of six phases, which take place in a fixed sequence. You must collect income if you can, but all other parts of the turn sequence are voluntary. When you finish the collect income phase, your turn is over. Play then passes to the next power. When every power has completed a turn, if no side has won, begin a new round of play.

Turn Sequence

     1. Purchase units
     2. Combat move
     3. Conduct combat
     4. Noncombat move
     5. Mobilize new units
     6. Collect income
 

Phase 1: Purchase Units

In this phase, you may spend IPCs for additional units to be used in future turns. All the units listed on the mobilization zone chart on the game board are available for purchase. A unit’s price in IPCs is listed in the cost column next to the unit’s name.

Purchase Units Sequence
     1. Order units
     2. Pay for units & industrial complex repairs
     3. Place units in mobilization zone

Step 1: Order Units
You may buy as many units of any type as you can afford. Select all the units you wish to buy.

Step 2. Pay for Units & Industrial Complex Repairs
Pay IPCs equal to the total cost of the units. You do not have to spend all of your IPCs. You can also pay to remove damage from industrial complexes that have been damaged. Each point of damage costs 1 IPC to remove. Repairs take effect immediately.

Step 3: Place Units in the Mobilization Zone
Your newly purchased units will be placed automatically in the Mobilization Zone, located in a tab in the lower left-hand corner of the application. You cannot use these units right away, but you will deploy them later in the turn.

Phase 2: Combat Move

 Movement in this game is separated into combat movement and noncombat movement phases. During the Combat Move phase, all movement must result in combat, with a few exceptions (see below). Movement into a hostile territory counts as a combat movement whether that space is occupied or not. Additional movement that does not result in combat occurs during the Noncombat Move phase (phase 4). NOTE: Game Table Online allows non-combat moves during combat as long as the player gains no advantage in doing so.

Move as many of your units into as many hostile territories and sea zones as you wish. You can move into a single hostile
space from different spaces, as long as each moving unit can reach that space with a legal move.

If you move all of your units out of a territory you control, you still retain control of that territory until an enemy moves into and controls it (the territory remains in control of the power that controlled it at the start of the turn).

Units cannot move into or through neutral territories.

Units from the same side can freely share territories, sea zones, and space on aircraft carriers and transports with one another. These shared events must be agreed upon by both powers.

All combat movement is considered to take place at the same time: Thus, you cannot move a unit, then conduct combat, then move that unit again during this phase. You cannot move additional units into an embattled space once an attack has begun.

A land or sea unit can move a number of spaces up to its move value. Most units must stop when they enter a hostile space. Thus, a unit with a move value of 2 could move into a friendly space and then a hostile space, or just into a hostile space.

An enemy submarine and/or transport does not block any of your units’ movement, nor does it prevent loading or offloading in that
sea zone. As the moving player, you have the option of attacking an enemy submarine and/or transport that shares a sea zone with
you. However, if a warship chooses to sink an unescorted transport, that warship must end its movement in that sea zone.

Sea Units Starting in Hostile Sea Zones

At the beginning of the Combat Move phase, you may already have sea units in spaces containing enemy units that were there at the start of your turn. For example, an enemy may have built new sea units in a sea zone where you have surface warships. When your turn comes around again, you are sharing that sea zone with enemy forces.

If you are sharing a sea zone with enemy surface warships (not submarines and/or transports), this situation requires you to do one of the following:

Once these sea units have moved and/or participated in combat, they cannot move or participate in the Noncombat Move phase of the turn.

Air Units

An air unit that moves in the Combat Move phase must reserve part of its move value for the Noncombat Move phase, at which point it must return to a safe landing spot using its remaining movement.

An air unit’s movement in any complete turn is limited to its total move value. Thus, a bomber with a move value of 6 cannot move six spaces to get to a hostile space. It must save enough movement points to get to a friendly territory where it can land. A fighter can move its full four spaces to attack in a sea zone instead of saving movement, but only if a carrier could be there for it to land on by the conclusion of the Mobilize New Units phase.

Air units attacking territories that have antiaircraft guns will be fired upon. This does not include territories containing antiaircraft guns that are only being flown over.

Amphibious Assaults

 If you want to make any amphibious assaults, announce your intent to do so during the Combat Move phase. An amphibious assault takes place when you attack a coastal territory from a non-hostile sea zone by offloading land units from transports into that target territory (or make a joint attack with both seaborne units that are offloading and other units from one or more neighboring territories).

Moving transports and their cargo into a sea zone from which you plan to make an amphibious assault counts as a combat move, even if there are no defending surface warships there. This is also true of any battleships and/or cruisers that will support the assault.

During the Conduct Combat phase, you can only launch amphibious assaults that you announced during this phase.

If an amphibious assault involves a sea combat, any air units participating in the assault must move to either the sea zone or the land territory. They will then participate only in the part of the assault to which they have moved.

Special Combat Movement

A number of units can make special moves during this phase. These are described in detail below.

Aircraft Carriers
Any fighters belonging to an aircraft carrier launch before the carrier moves and move independently of the carrier. These fighters can make a combat move from the carrier’s sea zone, or they can remain in the sea zone until the Noncombat Move phase.

Guest fighters belonging to a friendly power on board another power’s carrier must remain on board as cargo if the carrier
moves in combat. They cannot take part in combat and are destroyed if the carrier is destroyed.

Whether it moves during the Combat Move or Noncombat Move phase, an aircraft carrier allows friendly fighters to land on it
in the sea zone where it finishes its move.

Submarines
Submarines are capable of moving undetected due to their ability to submerge. For this reason, they have special movement rules. If there are no enemy destroyers present, a submarine can move through a sea zone containing enemy warships without stopping. However, if a submarine enters a sea zone containing an enemy destroyer during the Combat Move phase, its movement ends immediately and combat will result.

Tanks and Blitzing
A tank can “blitz” by moving through an unoccupied hostile territory as the first part of a move that can end in a friendly or hostile territory. The complete move must occur during the Combat Move phase. The tank establishes control of the first territory before it moves to the next. Place your control marker on the first territory and adjust the national production levels as you blitz. A tank that encounters enemy units, including an antiaircraft gun or industrial complex, in the first territory it enters must stop there.

Transports
If a transport encounters hostile surface warships (not enemy submarines and/or transports) AFTER it begins to move (not
counting the sea zone it started in), its movement for that turn ends, and it must stop there and conduct sea combat.

A transport can load units while in any friendly sea zone along its route, including the sea zone it started in. If a transport loads land units during the Combat Move phase, it must offload those units to attack a hostile territory as part of an amphibious assault during the Conduct Combat phase, or it must retreat during the sea combat step of the amphibious assault sequence while attempting to do so. A transport that is part of an amphibious assault must end its movement in a friendly sea zone (or one that could become friendly as result of sea combat) from which it can conduct the assault.

Any land units aboard a transport are considered cargo until they offload. Cargo cannot take part in sea combat and is destroyed if the transport is destroyed.

Phase 3: Conduct Combat

In this phase, you conduct combat against opposing units using the following sequence:

Combat Sequence:

     1. Strategic Bombing Raids

     2. Amphibious Assaults

     3. General Combat

A number of units have special rules that modify or overwrite the combat rules in this section. See Unit Profiles, below, for combat rules associated with each type of unit.

At no time can an Allies power attack another Allies power, or an Axis power attack another Axis power.

1. Strategic Bombing Raids

During this step, you can bomb the enemy’s industrial complexes with your bombers. A strategic bombing raid is an economic attack. The attacking bombers will cause a number of points of damage to the target complexes equal to the total rolled on the dice used for the attack.

After resolving any antiaircraft fire (see Antiaircraft Guns, below), surviving bombers each roll one die. Any damage done by the attacking bomber(s) will be marked on the Industrial Complex automatically. An industrial complex cannot receive more total damage than twice the IPC value of the territory on which it is located. Any excess damage is not applied.

A bomber that performed a strategic bombing raid cannot participate in any other combat this turn and must return to a friendly territory during the Noncombat Move phase.

NOTE: The optional rule that allows fighters to assist in and defend  against Strategic Bombing Raids is not implemented in Game Table Online's application.

2. Amphibious Assault

During this step you will resolve each amphibious assault you announced during the Combat Move phase.

Amphibious Assault Sequence

     1. Sea combat

     2. Battleship & cruiser bombardment

     3. Land Combat

Step 1. Sea Combat: If there are defending surface warships, sea combat occurs. If there are only defending submarines and/or transports, the attacker can choose to ignore those units or conduct sea combat.

If sea combat occurs, all attacking sea units must participate in the battle. Conduct the sea combat using the rules for General Combat (see below), then go to step 3 (land combat).

If no sea combat occurs, go to step 2 (bombardment).

Step 2. Battleship & Cruiser Bombardment: If there was NOT a combat in the sea zone from which you are offloading units from transports, any accompanying battleships and cruisers in that sea zone can bombard the coastal territory being attacked. The number of ships that can make bombardment attacks is limited to one ship per land unit being offloaded from the transports in that coastal territory. Choosing to destroy enemy transports or attacking enemy submarines in step 1 (above) counts as a combat and prevents the battleship and cruiser bombardment from taking place.

Roll one die for each battleship and cruiser that can conduct bombardment. Battleships hit on a die roll of “4” or less, and cruisers hit on a “3” or less. Bombardment casualties will be able to defend during the land combat step before they are eliminated.

Each battleship or cruiser can only bombard one coastal territory per turn.

Step 3. Land Combat: If the sea zone has been cleared of all defending enemy warships except submarines and transports, and the attacker still has land units committed to the coastal territory, all attacking and defending units will appear on the battle board to conduct combat using the general combat rules.

Attacking land units can come from transports (seaborne), and they can come from neighboring territories that are adjacent to
the attacked territory. Any land units offloading from a single transport can only be offloaded into a single hostile territory.

If no land units (carried as cargo) survived the sea combat, or if the attacking sea units withdrew from the sea combat, then
any other units that were designated to participate in the land attack (including air units) must still conduct one round of land
combat in a regular attack on the intended hostile territory before they can retreat.

If the attacker does not have any attacking land or air units left, the amphibious assault is over.

Attacking seaborne units cannot retreat. Attacking overland land units and aircraft can retreat (between rounds of combat). All attacking overland land units must retreat together as a group. They can only retreat to where at least one of them originated and must all retreat at the same time and to the same place. A retreat may happen at the conclusion of any round of combat.

Attacking air units, whether involved in the sea combat or the attack on the coastal territory, can retreat according to the
attacker retreat rules (Condition B—Attacker Retreats, below). If there is a retreat, air units and overland units (if any) must
retreat at the same time. Air units will land during the Noncombat Move phase.

Air Units:

 Each attacking air unit can participate in the sea battle or the attack on the coastal territory; it cannot do both. The attacking player must declare which air units are involved in each part of the attack and cannot change their assignments later. At the end of the amphibious assault, all aircraft remain in place; they will land during the Noncombat Move phase.

Air units defending in a territory can only fight in that territory. They cannot participate in the sea combat.

 3. General Combat

In this step, you resolve combat in each space that contains your units and enemy units. Combat is resolved by following the General Combat sequence. Combat in each space takes place at the same time, but each affected territory or sea zone is resolved separately and completely before resolving combat in the next contested space. The attacker decides the order of spaces in which each combat occurs. No new units can enter as reinforcements once combat has begun. Attacking and defending units in each space are considered to fire at the same time, but for ease of play you roll dice in sequence: attacker first, then defender.

General Combat Sequence

     1. Place units along the battle strip
     2. Submarine surprise strike or submerge (sea battles only)
     3. Attacking units fire
     4. Defending units fire
     5. Remove defender’s casualties
     6. Press attack or retreat
     7. Conclude combat

Step 1. Place Units Along The Battle Strip

Units will be automatically arranged in the battle window. The top half of this window will contain all attacking units for each battle, and the lower half will contain all defending units. Dice rolls for attacking units will be displayed in the left-hand dice-viewer, and defending rolls in the right, with hits and misses displayed beneath these.

In a sea battle, cargo (units on transports, guest fighters on aircraft carriers) does not roll attacks, nor can it take a hit. It is lost with the ship carrying it if that ship is destroyed.

If you are attacking in a sea zone that already contained friendly units, your ally’s units are not placed in the battle board window, but remain out of play for this combat sequence.

Step 2. Submarine Surprise Strike or Submerge (Sea Battles Only)

This step is specific to attacking and defending submarines. Before the general sea battle takes place (steps 3–5), both attacking and defending submarines can choose to either make a Surprise Strike die roll or submerge. However, if your opponent has a destroyer in the battle, your attacking or defending submarines cannot submerge or make a Surprise Strike and combat proceeds normally with your submarines firing along with your other units in step 3 or 4.

Attacking or defending submarines that choose to submerge are removed from the battle strip and placed on the game board in the contested sea zone, removing them from the remaining battle sequences.

Each attacking submarine conducting a Surprise Strike attack rolls one die. Attacking submarines that roll a “2” or less score a hit. After the attacking player has rolled for all attacking submarines, the defender chooses one sea unit (submarines cannot hit air units) for each hit scored and moves it behind the casualty strip.

Then each defending submarine conducting a Surprise Strike attack rolls one die. Defending submarines that roll a “1” score a hit. After the defending player has rolled for all defending submarines, the attacker chooses one sea unit for each hit scored and removes it from play.

Note: Decisions on whether attacking and defending submarines will fire or submerge must be made before any dice are
rolled. The attacking player decides first.

Note: In both cases, attacking or defending, transports can only be chosen as a casualty if there are no other eligible units. Submerged submarines cannot be chosen as a casualty since they have been removed from the battle.

Once all attacking and defending submarines that conducted a Surprise Strike attack have fi red, the casualties they have generated are removed from the game and this step is over. Any hits made during this step that do not destroy units (such as battleships) remain in effect until the end of the combat.

Step 3. Attacking Units Fire (Land and Sea Battles)

Roll one die for each attacking unit with an attack value that did not fire in step 2. An attacking unit scores a hit if you roll its attack value or less. This step occurs automatically.

After the attacking player has rolled for all attacking units, the defender chooses one unit for each hit scored as casualties. These units will return fire in Step 4.

Step 4. Defending Units Fire (Land and Sea Battles)

Defending units roll one die for each unit with a defense value that did not fire in step 2 (including units behind the casualty strip). A defending unit scores a hit if you roll its defense value or less. This step occurs automatically.

After the defending player has rolled for each defending unit with a defense value, the attacker chooses one unit for each hit
scored and removes it from play.

Specific to Sea Battles:  In both steps 3 and 4, submarines that fired in step 2 cannot fire again during the same combat round. If there is an enemy destroyer in the battle, submarines fire in step 3 or 4 rather than step 2. Remember that in sea battles hits from air units cannot be assigned to submarines unless there is a destroyer that is friendly to the air units in the battle, and hits can only be assigned to transports if there are no other eligible units.

Defenseless Transports: In a sea battle, if the defender has only transports remaining and the attacker still has units capable of attacking, the defending transports are all destroyed, along with their cargo. This occurs automatically.

This also occurs if the defender has only transports and submerged submarines remaining, and the attacker has only air units remaining. The air units and submarines cannot hit each other, so the transports are defenseless. At this point, defenseless transports are all destroyed, along with their cargo. Attacking transports are never considered defenseless, since they have the option of retreating. Remember, however, that destroying defenseless transports in this way still counts as combat for the purposes of offshore bombardment and similar rules.

 

Step 5. Remove Defender's Casualties (Land and Sea Battles)

The defender's destroyed units will be removed automatically.

Step 6. Press Attack or Retreat

Combat rounds (steps 2–5) continue unless one of the following two conditions occurs (in this order):

Condition A—Attacker and/or Defender Loses All Units

Once all units with combat values on one or both sides have been destroyed, the combat ends.

If a player has combat units remaining, that player wins the combat.

In a sea battle, if both sides have only transports remaining, the attacker’s transports can remain in the contested sea zone or retreat per the rules in Condition B below, if possible.

Condition B—Attacker Retreats

The attacker (never the defender) can retreat during this step. Move all attacking land and sea units in that combat  to a single adjacent friendly space from which at least one of the attacking land or sea units moved. These will be highlighted. In the case of sea units, that space must have been friendly at the start of the turn. All such units must retreat together to the same territory, regardless of where they came from.

Retreating air units remain in the contested space temporarily. They complete their retreat movement during the Noncombat Move phase using the same rules as an air unit involved in a successful battle.

Step 7. Conclude Combat

If you win a combat as the attacker in a territory and you have one or more surviving land units there, you take control of it. Otherwise, it remains in the defender’s control. (If all units on both sides were destroyed, the territory remains in the defender’s control.) Sea units cannot take control of a territory; they must stay at sea.

Air units cannot capture a territory. If your attack force has only air units remaining, you cannot occupy the territory you attacked, even if there are no enemy units remaining. Air units must return to a friendly territory or carrier during the Noncombat Move phase. Until then, they stay at the space where they fought.

Surviving land units will be automatically placed in the newly conquered territory along with your power's control marker. In addition, national production levels will be adjusted automatically. Your national production increases by the value of the captured territory; the loser’s production decreases by the same amount.

An antiaircraft gun or industrial complex located in the captured territory now belongs to your side (see Liberating a Territory,
next page). If you capture an antiaircraft gun, you cannot move it in the Noncombat Move phase of the same turn. If you
capture an industrial complex, you cannot mobilize new units there until your next turn.

Liberating a Territory

If you capture a territory that was originally controlled by another member of your side, you “liberate” the territory. You do not take control of it; instead, the original controller regains the territory and the national production level is adjusted. Antiaircraft guns or industrial complexes in that territory revert to the original controller of the territory.

If the original controller’s capital is in enemy hands at the end of the turn in which you would otherwise have liberated the
territory, you capture the territory, you adjust your national production level, and you can use any industrial complex there
until the original controller’s capital is liberated. You also take ownership of any antiaircraft gun in that territory.

 Capturing and Liberating Capitals

If you capture a territory containing an enemy capital (Washington, Moscow, London, Berlin, or Tokyo), follow the same rules as for capturing a territory. Add the captured territory’s income value to your national production level.

In addition, you collect all unspent IPCs from the original controller of the captured capital. For example, if Germany conquers Moscow while the Soviet Union’s player is holding 18 IPCs, those IPCs are immediately transferred to Germany’s player. You collect these IPCs even if your own capital is in enemy hands.

The original controller of the captured capital is still in the game but cannot collect income from any territories he or she still controls and cannot buy new units. The player skips all but the Combat Move, Conduct Combat, and Noncombat Move phases until the capital is liberated. If that power or one on its side liberates the capital, the original controller can once again collect income from territories he or she controls, including territories reverting control to him or her.

If a capital is liberated, the industrial complex and any antiaircraft guns in that capital territory revert ownership to the original
controller of the capital. Other territories and industrial complexes that were originally controlled by the newly liberated capital’s controller but are currently in the hands of friendly powers also revert control. Antiaircraft guns in reverting territories outside the newly liberated capital territory remain under their pre-liberation ownership.

You do not collect IPCs from the controlling power when you liberate a capital. For example, if the United Kingdom’s player takes Moscow from Germany’s player, Germany’s player does not surrender any IPCs.

Capturing a Victory City

When you capture a territory containing an enemy victory city, the victory city totals for each side will be automatically adjusted. If at the end of the round after the U.S. player’s turn your side controls enough victory cities to achieve the victory conditions you decided upon at the start of the game, your side wins.

 Multinational Forces

Units on the same side can share a territory or sea zone, constituting a multinational force. Such forces can defend together,
but they cannot attack together. (This does not mean powers can share income: only the power that controls a territory collects
income for that territory.)

A multinational force cannot attack the same space together. Any units in a sea zone in which a battle occurs that belong to an ally of the attacker (other than cargo on an attacker’s ship) cannot participate in the battle in any way. Such units cannot be taken as losses in the sea combat and have no effect on defending submarines. Each attacking power moves and fires its own units on its own turn.

An attacking fighter can launch from an aircraft carrier owned by an ally, but the ally’s carrier cannot move until its controller’s turn. Similarly, an attacking carrier can carry an ally’s fighter as cargo, but the ally’s fighter cannot participate in an attack by that carrier.

An attacking land unit can assault a coastal territory from an ally’s transport, but only on the attacking land unit owner’s turn.

Multinational Defense: When a space containing a multinational force is attacked, all its units defend together. If the defending units belong to powers under the control of different players, those players mutually determine the casualties.

Transporting Multinational Forces: Transports belonging to a friendly power can load and offload your land units. This is a
three-step process:
1. You load your land units aboard the friendly transport on your turn.
2. The transport’s controller moves it (or not) on that player’s turn.
3. You offload your land units on your next turn.

Phase 4: Noncombat Move

In this phase, you can move any of your units that did not move in the Combat Move phase or participate in combat during your turn. You will also land all your aircraft that participated in and survived the Conduct Combat phase. This is a good time to gather your units, either to fortify vulnerable territories or to reinforce units at the front.

Only aircraft and submarines can move through hostile spaces during this phase.

Where Units Can Move

Land Units: A land unit can move into any friendly territory. It cannot move into a hostile territory (not even one that contains
no combat units but is enemy-controlled). Note, this is the only phase in which antiaircraft guns can move.

Air Units: An air unit must end its move in an eligible landing space. Bombers and fighters can land in any territory that was
friendly at the start of your turn.

Only fighters can land in a sea zone with a friendly carrier present. A landing spot must be available on the carrier.

Additionally:

Aircraft that cannot move to an eligible landing space by the end of the Noncombat Move phase are destroyed.

Neither bombers nor fighters can land in any territory  that was hostile at the start of your turn, including any territory that was
just captured by you this turn.

Sea Units: A sea unit can move through any friendly sea zone. It cannot move into or through a hostile sea zone.

Unlike other sea units, submarines can move through and even into hostile sea zones in the Noncombat Move phase. However,
a submarine must end its movement when it enters a sea zone containing one or more enemy destroyers.

Transports can move to friendly coastal territories and load or offload cargo, unless they loaded, moved, offloaded, or were involved in combat during the Combat Move or Conduct Combat phase.

Aircraft carriers can move to sea zones to allow friendly fighters to land. They must move there if they did not move in the Combat Move phase and the friendly sea zone is the only valid landing zone for the fighters. An aircraft carrier must end its move once a fighter has landed on it.

Phase 5: Mobilize New Units

Move the newly purchased units from the mobilization zone in the lower left-hand corner of the application to eligible spaces you have controlled since the start of your turn, with the following exceptions (below). You cannot use industrial complexes that you captured or purchased this turn.

Restrictions on Placement

For each industrial complex, you can mobilize only as many units as the IPC income value of the territory containing the industrial complex. This limit includes units mobilized in sea zones adjacent to the industrial complex. For example, the German player can mobilize 6 units in the Southern Europe territory.

Damage as a result of strategic bombing raids is indicated by a number on affected Industrial Complexes--this number is subtracted from the base production value of the territory automatically, and reduces the number of new units that can be placed. You cannot place your new units at an industrial complex owned by a friendly power.

Place land units and bombers only in territories containing eligible industrial complexes. Land units cannot enter play on transports.

Place sea units only in sea zones adjacent to territories containing eligible industrial complexes. New sea units can enter play
even in a hostile sea zone. No combat occurs because the Conduct Combat phase is over.

Place fighters into territories containing an industrial complex controlled by your power from the start of your turn, or on an aircraft carrier owned by your power in a sea zone (even a hostile one) adjacent to a territory with such an industrial complex. The aircraft carrier may be either a new one currently being mobilized, or an existing one already in place. You cannot place a new fighter on a carrier owned by a friendly power.

Place new industrial complexes in any territory that you have controlled since the start of your turn and that has an income value of at least 1. You cannot have more than one industrial complex per territory.

In the event that you purchased more units than you can actually mobilize due to production limitations, you must return the over-produced units to the box (your choice on which units), and the cost of the reimbursed units is returned to you.

Phase 6: Collect Income

In this phase, you earn production income to finance future attacks and strategies. You will automatically collect IPCs equal to your national production level, as indicated in the power listings above the chat log.
If your capital is under an enemy power’s control, you cannot collect income. A power cannot lend or give IPCs to another
power, even if both powers are on the same side.

 WINNING THE GAME

At the end of the United States player’s turn, check to see if either side has won the game based on the victory city conditions
you set at the start of the game. This step occurs automatically.

 

Victory Level
# of Victory Cities Controlled
 MINOR 8
 MODERATE (default) 9
 MAJOR 10
 DECISIVE 11
 TOTAL 12


UNIT PROFILES

This section provides detailed information for each unit in the game. Each entry provides a quick statistical reference about that unit’s cost in IPCs, its attack and defense values, and the number of territories or sea zones it can move. Each unit type also has unit characteristics, which are summarized below these statistics.

Land Units

Infantry

Cost: 3

Attack: 1

Defense: 2

Move: 1

Unit Characteristics

Supported by Artillery: When an infantry attacks along with an artillery, the infantry’s attack increases to 2. Each infantry must be matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit. If your infantry outnumber your artillery, the excess infantry units still have an attack of 1. For example, if you attack with two artillery and five infantry, two of your infantry have an attack of 2 and the rest have an attack of 1. Infantry are not supported by artillery on defense.

Artillery

Cost:
4

Attack:
2

Defense:
2

Move:
1

Unit Characteristics

Supports Infantry: When an infantry attacks along with an artillery, the infantry’s attack increases to 2. Each infantry must be
matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit. Artillery does not support infantry on defense.

Tanks

Cost:
5

Attack:
3

Defense:
3

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Blitz: Tanks can “blitz” by moving through an unoccupied hostile territory as the first part of a two-space move that can end in a friendly or hostile territory. This complete move must occur during the Combat Move phase. By blitzing, the tank establishes control of the first territory before it moves to the next. The second territory can be friendly or hostile, or even the space the tank came from. A tank that encounters enemy units in the first territory it enters must stop there, even if the unit is an antiaircraft gun or industrial complex.

Antiaircraft Guns

Cost:
6

Attack:
--

Defense:
1

Move:
1 (noncombat only)

Unit Characteristics

Limited Move: An antiaircraft gun cannot move during the Combat Move phase (other than being carried on a transport if the antiaircraft gun was loaded on a prior turn).

Air Defense: An antiaircraft gun can only fire at an air unit when that unit attacks the territory containing that antiaircraft gun.
Antiaircraft guns fire only once, before the first round of combat. Roll one die against each attacking air unit. On a roll of “1,” that air unit is destroyed and immediately removed from the game. If all the aircraft are the same, fighters or bombers, there is no need to differentiate them. However, if there is a mix of fighters and bombers, you must assign specific dice rolls to specific aircraft by indicating which aircraft is being rolled against. A roll of “1” destroys the specified aircraft. This antiaircraft attack is made immediately before normal combat occurs in the territory containing the antiaircraft gun.

Only one antiaircraft gun can fire in a battle, no matter how many are in the territory (and even if the others are controlled by different powers).

Subject to Capture: If a territory is captured, any antiaircraft guns there are also captured. Their new owner is the player controlling the territory at the end of that turn, and that owner can use those antiaircraft guns in future combats. Antiaircraft guns are never destroyed, except when a transport carrying one is sunk. If you move an antiaircraft gun into a territory controlled by a friendly power, place one of your control markers under it.

 

Industrial Complexes

Cost:
15

Attack: --


Defense: --


Move: --


Unit Characteristics

Cannot Attack, Defend, or Move: An industrial complex cannot attack, defend, or move. It cannot be transported.


Damaged Factories (industrial complexes): Bombers can damage industrial complexes directly. Any damage sustained will be automatically indicated on the affected Industrial Complex. Total damage to an industrial complex cannot exceed twice the IPC value of the territory on which the factory is located. Industrial complexes cannot be destroyed. They can be heavily damaged, however, and can be damaged to the point where they have at least as many damage markers as they have production capacity. In this case, no new units can enter the game through that factory until it is repaired.

Damage points can be removed at a cost of 1 IPC each. These repairs are paid for (and the points are removed) during the Purchase Units phase of the turn.

Subject to Capture: If a territory is captured, an industrial complex there is also captured. The capturing player can use it on the turn after it is captured, but any existing damage points remain on the industrial complex. You cannot place your new units at an industrial complex owned by a friendly power. Even if you liberate a territory with an industrial complex in it, you cannot use the complex; the original controller can use it on his or her next turn.

Air Units

Fighters and bombers can attack and defend in territories. Both can attack in sea zones. Fighters stationed on carriers can defend in sea zones. Both can land only in friendly territories or (in the case of fighters) on friendly aircraft carriers. Your air units cannot land in territories you just captured, whether they were involved in the combat or not. Air units can move through hostile territories and sea zones as if they were friendly. However, they are exposed to antiaircraft fire during combat whenever they attack a hostile territory that contains an antiaircraft gun.

To determine range, count each space your air unit enters “after takeoff.” When moving over water from a coastal territory or an island group, count the first sea zone entered as one space. When flying to an island group, count the surrounding sea zone and the island group itself as one space each. (An island is considered a territory within a sea zone; air units based on an island cannot defend the surrounding sea zone.) When moving a fighter from a carrier, do not count the carrier’s sea zone as the first space—your fighter is in that sea zone. To participate in combat, a fighter must take off from its carrier before the carrier moves, otherwise it is cargo.

You cannot send air units on “suicide runs”—deliberately moving them into combat with no place to land afterward. If there
is any question about whether an attack is a suicide run, then in the Combat Move phase you must declare, prior to rolling
any battles, some possible way (however remote the possibility is) for all your attacking air units to land safely that turn. This could include a combination of combat moves. It could also include noncombat moves by a carrier. If it does include a noncombat move by a carrier, then the carrier cannot move in the Combat Move phase.

In order to demonstrate that an air unit MAY have a safe landing zone, you may assume that all of your attacking rolls will
be hits, and all defending rolls will be misses. You may NOT, however, use a planned retreat of any carrier to demonstrate a
possible safe landing zone for any fighter.

If you declared that a carrier will move during the Noncombat Move phase to provide a safe landing zone for a fighter moved in the Combat Move phase, you must follow through and move the carrier to its planned location in the Noncombat Move phase unless the fighter has landed safely elsewhere or has been destroyed before then.

Aircraft can hit submarines if a friendly destroyer is in the battle.
Whenever a round of combat starts and there is no enemy destroyer, submarines may submerge before being fired upon and cannot be hit

 

Fighters

Cost:
10

Attack:
3

Defense:
4

Move:
4

Unit Characteristics

Land on Aircraft Carriers: Fighters can be carried by aircraft carriers. Up to two fighters can be on a friendly aircraft carrier
at a time. A fighter must be launched from the carrier’s initial position to participate in combat this turn. However, it can land on a carrier in the Noncombat Move phase (even if retreating) or during any other noncombat move. (A fighter cannot land on a carrier during the carrier’s movement.) Your aircraft carrier can move to a sea zone where one of your fighters has ended its move (and in fact, it must do so if it is able) but cannot move any farther that turn.

A fighter based on a defending carrier must land on the same carrier if possible. If that carrier is destroyed in combat, it must
try to land elsewhere. It must land on a different friendly carrier in the same sea zone, move 1 space to a friendly territory, island, or aircraft carrier, or be destroyed. This movement occurs after all of the attacker’s combats have been resolved and before the attacker’s Noncombat Move phase begins.

Each of your fighters based on your attacking carrier launches before combat (even if it is not participating in combat) and can retreat to a friendly territory, island, or carrier within range if it survives combat. If any fighter is not in an eligible landing space by the end of the Noncombat Move phase, it is destroyed. (Note that an eligible landing space can include a sea zone in which a new carrier will be placed in the Mobilize New Units phase, as long as there is a landing space available on it.).
 

Bombers

Cost:
12

Attack:
4

Defense:
1

Move:
6

Unit Characteristics

Strategic Bombing Raids: A bomber can either participate in normal combat or make an economic attack against an enemy industrial complex. During the strategic bombing raid step of the Conduct Combat phase, bombers that survive any antiaircraft fire can attack the industrial complex. Roll one die for each surviving bomber. The bombers will cause a number of points of damage to the industrial complex equal to the total rolled on the dice. The maximum total damage strategic bombing raids can inflict on an industrial complex is twice the territory’s IPC value.

Sea Units

Battleships, aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, transports, and submarines move, attack, and defend in sea zones. They cannot move into territories. For the sake of these rules, the following are surface warships: battleships, carriers, cruisers, and destroyers. Transports are not part of the group called warships. Submarines are warships, but they are not surface warships.

All sea units can move up to two sea zones. They cannot move through hostile sea zones. If enemy units other than transports or submarines occupy a sea zone, the sea zone is hostile and your sea units end their movement and enter combat. Submarines are an exception: They can pass through a hostile sea zone without stopping, unless there is an enemy destroyer present (see Destroyers, next page).

Some sea units can carry other units. Transports can carry only land units. Aircraft carriers can carry only fighters.

Battleships

Cost:
20

Attack:
4

Defense:
4

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Two Hits to Destroy: Attacking and defending battleships require 2 hits to destroy. Damage will be marked automatically during combat. If a battleship survives a combat having taken one hit, all damage is removed at the end of combat.

Offshore Bombardment: Your battleships and cruisers can conduct offshore bombardment during an amphibious assault. These battleships and cruisers must be in the same sea zone as the offloading transport before they can conduct this bombardment. Each battleship and cruiser fires against enemy land units in the territory being attacked prior to land combat. Battleships and cruisers cannot conduct offshore bombardment if they were involved in a sea combat prior to the amphibious assault and cannot conduct more than one bombardment per turn. The number of battleships and cruisers that can bombard during an amphibious assault is limited to one ship per land unit being offloaded from the transports in that coastal territory. During bombardment, battleships hit on a die roll of “4” or less.
 

Aircraft Carriers

Cost:
14

Attack:
1

Defense:
2

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Carry Fighters: An aircraft carrier can carry up to two fighters, including those belonging to friendly powers. Fighters from friendly powers can take off and land from your carriers, but only during that power’s turn. Any fighters belonging to the aircraft carrier owner move independently of the carrier. These fighters can make a combat move from the carrier’s original sea zone, or they can remain in the original sea zone until the Noncombat Move phase. Fighters belonging to friendly powers on attacking carriers are always treated as cargo, because it is not their turn. Your aircraft carrier can move to or remain in a sea zone where one of your fighters will end its noncombat move (and in fact, it must do so if it is able).

Fighter Defense: Whenever a carrier is attacked, its fighters (even those belonging to friendly powers) are considered to be defending in the air and can be chosen as casualties rather than the carrier. (However, a fighter cannot be chosen as a casualty from a submarine hit, because submarines can attack only sea units).

 

Cruisers

Cost:
12

Attack:
3

Defense:
3

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Offshore Bombardment: Your battleships and cruisers can conduct offshore bombardment during an amphibious assault. These battleships and cruisers must be in the same sea zone as the offloading transport before they can conduct this bombardment. Each battleship and cruiser fires against enemy land units in the territory being attacked prior to land combat. Battleships and cruisers cannot conduct offshore bombardment if they were involved in a sea combat prior to the amphibious assault and cannot conduct more than one bombardment per turn. The number of battleships and cruisers that can bombard during an amphibious assault is limited to one ship per land unit being offloaded from the transports in that coastal territory. During bombardment, cruisers hit on a die roll of “3” or less.

 

Destroyers

Cost:
8

Attack:
2

Defense:
2

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Anti-sub Vessel: A destroyer cancels the Treat Hostile Sea Zones as Friendly unit characteristic of any enemy submarines that
move into the sea zone with it. If a destroyer is involved in a battle, it cancels the Submersible, Surprise Strike, and Cannot
Be Hit by Air Units unit characteristics of all enemy submarines in that battle.

 

Submarines

Cost:
6

Attack:
2

Defense:
1

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

Submarines have several unit characteristics. Most of them are either canceled or stopped by the presence of an
enemy destroyer.

Surprise Strike: Both attacking and defending submarines can make a Surprise Strike by fi ring before any other units fire in a
sea battle. As detailed in step 2 of the General Combat sequence (above), submarines make their rolls before any other units, unless an enemy destroyer is present.

Submersible: A submarine has the option of submerging. It can do this anytime it would otherwise roll the die to fire. When a submarine submerges, it is removed from the battle board window. As a result, it can no longer fire or take hits in that combat. However, a submarine cannot submerge if an enemy destroyer is present in the battle.

Treat Hostile Sea Zones as Friendly: A submarine can move through a sea zone that contains enemy units, either in combat or noncombat movement. However, if a submarine enters a sea zone containing an enemy destroyer, it must end its movement there. If it ends its combat move in a hostile sea zone, combat will occur.

Does Not Block Enemy Movement: The “stealth” ability of submarines also allows enemy ships to ignore their presence. Any sea zone that contains only enemy submarines does not stop the movement of a sea unit. Sea units ending their combat movement in a sea zone containing only enemy submarines may choose to attack them or not. Sea units can also end their noncombat movement in a sea zone containing only enemy submarines.

Cannot Hit Air Units: When attacking or defending, submarines cannot hit air units.

Cannot Be Hit by Air Units: When attacking or defending, hits scored by air units cannot be assigned to submarines unless
there is a destroyer that is friendly to the air units in the battle.

 

Transports

Cost:
7

Attack:
0

Defense:
0

Move:
2

Unit Characteristics

No Combat Value: Even though a transport can attack or defend, either alone or with other units, it has a combat value of 0. This means that a transport cannot fire in the attacking units’ or the defending units’ fire steps.

This lack of combat capability also allows enemy ships to ignore the presence of transports. Any sea zone that contains only enemy transports does not stop the movement of a sea unit. Air or sea units (other than transports) ending their combat movement in a sea zone containing only enemy transports automatically destroy those transports. This counts as a sea combat for those sea units. Sea units can also end their noncombat movement in a sea zone containing only enemy transports.

Chosen Last: Transports can only be chosen as a casualty if there are no other eligible units. Normally this will occur when only transports are left, but it can also occur under other circumstances. For example, fighters attacking transports and submarines will hit the transports because they cannot hit the submarines without a friendly destroyer present.

Carry Land Units: A transport can carry land units belonging to you or to friendly powers. Its capacity is any one land unit, plus one additional infantry. Thus, a full transport may carry a tank or an artillery and an infantry, an antiaircraft gun and an infantry, or two infantry. A transport cannot carry an industrial complex. Land units on a transport are cargo; they cannot attack or defend while at sea and are destroyed if their transport is destroyed.

Land units belonging to friendly powers must load on their controller’s turn, be carried on your turn, and offload on a later turn of their controller. This is true even if the transport remains in the same sea zone.

Loading onto and/or offloading from a transport counts as a land unit’s entire move; it cannot move before loading or after offloading. Place the land units alongside the transport in the sea zone. If the transport moves in the Noncombat Move phase, any number of units aboard can offload into a single friendly territory.

Loading and Offloading: A transport can load cargo in friendly sea zones before, during, and after it moves. A transport can pick up cargo, move one sea zone, pick up more cargo, move one more sea zone, and offload the cargo at the end of its movement. It can also remain at sea with the cargo still aboard (but only if the cargo remaining aboard was loaded in a previous turn or was loaded this turn in the Noncombat Move phase).

Whenever a transport offloads, it cannot move again that turn. If a transport retreats, it cannot offload that turn. A transport cannot offload in two territories during a single turn, nor can it offload cargo onto another transport. A transport cannot load or offload while in a hostile sea zone. Remember that hostile sea zones contain enemy units, but that for purposes of determining the status of a sea zone, submarines and transports are ignored.

A transport can load and offload units without moving from the friendly sea zone it is in (this is known as “bridging”). Each such transport is still limited to its cargo capacity. It can offload in only one territory, and once it offloads, it cannot move, load, or offload again that turn.

Amphibious Assaults: A transport can take part in an amphibious assault step of the Conduct Combat phase. That is the only
time a transport can offload into a hostile territory.

During an amphibious assault, a transport must either offload all units that were loaded during the Combat Move phase or
retreat during sea combat. It can also offload any number of units owned by the transport’s power that were already on board at
the start of the turn.


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